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 antique 2 speed bike
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Joseph Martin

USA
2093 Posts

Posted - 05/15/2018 :  17:31:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
from the sellers description you pedal forward for one speed, you pedal backward for the other speed. In the photos you can see the chain wrapping around the different size sprockets. I think one sprocket must have pawls to allow it to idle. Look at the link and see all the photos and try to explain it if you can.
Tony

https://www.ebay.com/itm/antique-bicycle-racing-bike-safety-penny-farthing/263671579013?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D44040%26meid%3Dd24d73d25a4c4c1285beeed2f4c5d3cb%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D9%26sd%3D163046463282%26itm%3D263671579013&_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851

Craig Allen

1101 Posts

Posted - 05/15/2018 :  18:12:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Now there's some clever engineering.There's a YouTube that explains it.
https://youtu.be/9ldp94MjZHo
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slcurts

USA
35 Posts

Posted - 05/15/2018 :  18:45:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bill Dizer has one of these, I believe.

-Stan

1899 G&J Rambler * ~1900 Ariel Titania * 1908 Cleveland Swell Special
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Joseph Martin

USA
2093 Posts

Posted - 05/17/2018 :  06:50:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
so you think you know how to ride a bike, now see this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFzDaBzBlL0
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Rex

USA
772 Posts

Posted - 05/17/2018 :  12:23:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You get some really weird looks as you start pedaling backwards going uphill! Just ask Carolyn Carter.

D. Rex Upshaw
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Mike Cates

USA
1816 Posts

Posted - 05/17/2018 :  12:40:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
At the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah there are motorcycle land speed racers that compete in streamliners(body shell over the rider)that have to learn to compensate changes in steering to the direction they want to go towards. This happens on "some streamliners" and not on others due to the laminar flow of air over the body at different speeds.
One approximate example is: 0-190mph you turn left to go left. Around 210mph you turn right to go left. Approaching 300mph the steering returns to normal. This has been known by racers and can only be experienced by doing the actual speed attempt itself.

Reverse steering is also apparent on other means of travel.
If you have ever sailed a boat, this can somewhat be related hydro dynamically: A sail boat can head into the wind direction at different angles as the wind is trying to push the sail away from it's direction but the rudder at the stern is steering the bow into the wind direction making the boat side slip in the water yet maintaining a forward course into the wind direction.

Reverse steering on a bicycle can be overcome quicker by looking at only the rear of the front wheel rather than the front of the front wheel for mental compensation. You can also try riding with your eyes closed(not recommended but if you try, do it in a large flat unobstructed area)and use your natural equilibrium to trigger your reaction time to turning into your falling direction to make the bicycle become upright and staying on a steady course.

Mike Cates, CA.

Edited by - Mike Cates on 05/17/2018 22:54:07
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Wing Your Heel

United Kingdom
183 Posts

Posted - 05/20/2018 :  05:55:59  Show Profile  Visit Wing Your Heel's Homepage  Reply with Quote

I have a men's, woman's and child's version of the Hirondelle Retro-Directe. You can see them here -

http://www.oldbike.eu/museum/childrens/1933-hirondelle-a-2-vitesses-retro-directes-no-60-pour-fillette/


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Mike Cates

USA
1816 Posts

Posted - 05/20/2018 :  10:51:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just curious, do the pedal axles screw into the crank arms with right and left hand threads? If so, is there a problem of the pedals backing out of the crank arms when riding in the opposite rotation over a period of time or from hard use? Just relating this from unicycle use.
Mike Cates, CA.

Edited by - Mike Cates on 05/20/2018 12:46:41
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Rex

USA
772 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2018 :  09:25:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mike Cates

Just curious, do the pedal axles screw into the crank arms with right and left hand threads? If so, is there a problem of the pedals backing out of the crank arms when riding in the opposite rotation over a period of time or from hard use? Just relating this from unicycle use.
Mike Cates, CA.


Many of the non coasting antiques had left hand threads on the drive side. Never had any problems with those I have. Figured they were done that way because much more pressure was put on drive train and pedals back pedaling than going forward. Also think the threads could all be right hand period. Modern fixed gear bikes are same as non fixed.

D. Rex Upshaw
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Joseph Martin

USA
2093 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2018 :  10:39:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
being a rider of both conventional geared bikes with freewheels and also fixed wheel bikes, I am reminded of my old boss at the Schwinn store back in the 1960 telling me if pedals are properly tightened and checked for tightness regularly you won't have a problem. As why the left pedal is always the one that causes trouble, he said "that's just the way it is, many have tried to explain it and their theories are usually easy to disagree with".
so, keep 'em tight!
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Rex

USA
772 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2018 :  05:18:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Had one of my pedals locking up about a mile into the ride to the 2013 Louisville Annual Meet on my 1896 Iver Johnson with Steve and Carolyn Carter. Got a set of cheap pedals at a local bike shop. Had to put the left one on the right side and right on the left side, of course. Had them on a few more rides until I finally replaced the fractured antique bearing. As Tony noted, just "keep 'em tight!" no matter which hand thread is where.

D. Rex Upshaw
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