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 Wellington and Oberlin, Ohio in history
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DeLombardR

USA
1743 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2018 :  22:55:07  Show Profile  Visit DeLombardR's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Here are two 1890 photos supplied by a historian in Wellington, just ten miles south of this summer's meet in Oberlin.

This looks like the Century Bicycle Club coming into town.
Notice the dust in the air in the distance.
I'm impressed with how wide the street is.
I have asked where this scene is relative to modern-day Wellington.

This Google Streetview appears to be the same scene today.
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.1685322,-82.2174786,3a,75y,348.47h,89.42t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sLg4umgKFqm9m9DVmd9rRBw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656


This building still stands in Wellington and the July 2 car show will be situated across the street, basically the view of this photo.

Slightly larger image is here:
http://ohiowheelmen.org/2018annualmeet/images/welllington/Wellington-HotelDeFoote-1890-cyclists.jpg

Here is a Google Streetview of that building.
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.1675577,-82.2175652,3a,75y,254.77h,92.1t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sp2VSN4HQ-6v8sMkm4il4Xg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

My 1892 LAW Handbook for the Ohio Division lists the American as the League hotel in town. The historian told me this about that hotel:
"The American House Hotel, scene of the Oberlin Wellington slave rescue, was torn down about 1901 and the Herrick Memorial Library was built in its place in 1902."
And what was that rescue, you might ask?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oberlin%E2%80%93Wellington_Rescue

Speaking of history, did you know that Oberlin is the birthplace of the Anti-Saloon League and the Hall-Héroult process, the process of reducing aluminum from its fluoride salts by electrolysis, which made industrial production of aluminum possible. As in ALCOA.

Oberlin College is the oldest coeducational liberal arts college in the United States and the second oldest continuously operating coeducational institute of higher learning in the world. The Oberlin Conservatory of Music, part of the college, is the oldest continuously operating conservatory in the United States.

Oberlin College's role as an educator of African-American students prior to the Civil War and thereafter is historically significant. In 1844, Oberlin College graduated its first black student, George B. Vashon, who became one of the founding professors at Howard University and the first black lawyer admitted to the Bar in New York State.

Edited by - DeLombardR on 02/14/2018 00:01:33

DeLombardR

USA
1743 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2018 :  23:06:38  Show Profile  Visit DeLombardR's Homepage  Reply with Quote
By the way, the Nickel Plate Restaurant referred to in the caption is most likely related to the Nickel Plate Road that passed through Wellington. The Nickel Plate was a nickname for the New York, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York,_Chicago_and_St._Louis_Railroad
"During a newspaper war to attract the New York, Chicago and St. Louis the Norwalk, Ohio Chronicle Newspaper referred to the New York, Chicago and St. Louis as "... double-track nickel-plated railroad." The New York, Chicago and St. Louis adopted the nickname and it became better known as the Nickel Plate Road."

Speaking of area train lines, our OHWT will go from Oberlin to the quaint town of Kipton, site of a famous 1891 train wreck.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kipton,_Ohio
"On this line, Kipton was the site of a famous train wreck on April 18, 1891, which was caused by railroad engineers' watches not being in sync and led to the adoption of stringent quality-control standards for railroad chronometers in 1893."
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Craig Allen

1071 Posts

Posted - 02/14/2018 :  03:52:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I would date those photos mid to late 1890's.
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DeLombardR

USA
1743 Posts

Posted - 02/14/2018 :  07:07:53  Show Profile  Visit DeLombardR's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thank you, Craig. That's what I thought but just put the info there that I was given.

I'll go one further, I bet it was after the American House Hotel was demolished in 1901 for the wheelmen to be at the Hotel DeFoote.
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Rex

USA
765 Posts

Posted - 02/14/2018 :  09:54:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great pictures, Google views and historical info! Thanks, Dick.

D. Rex Upshaw
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John Skocdopole

USA
138 Posts

Posted - 02/18/2018 :  09:08:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hall-Heroult process, is still used today.

1886 - Eight months after graduating from Oberlin College, Charles Martin Hall discovered an inexpensive method of for smelting aluminium. The same electrolytic process was discovered concurrently by the French chemist Paul L.T. Heroult and is therefore known as the Hall-Heroult process.

Hall continued his research and development for the rest of his life and was granted 22 US patents, most on aluminum production. He served on the Oberlin College Board of Trustees. He was vice-president of Alcoa until his death.

Hall was one of Oberlin College's most prominent benefactors, and an aluminum statue of him exists on the campus. Because of its light weight, Hall's statue was once known for its frequent changes of location, often due to student pranks. Today the statue is glued to a large granite block and sits more permanently on the second floor of Oberlin's new science center, where students continue to decorate Hall with appropriate trappings on holidays and other occasions.
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Joseph Martin

USA
2035 Posts

Posted - 02/18/2018 :  11:35:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thanks for posting the history John. It piqued my interest so I did some research and found this web page:
http://www.aluminum-production.com/Basic_functioning.html


Edited by - Joseph Martin on 02/18/2018 11:36:15
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John Skocdopole

USA
138 Posts

Posted - 02/18/2018 :  12:32:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cool site! Until recently, the company I work for did large industrial welds to the DC bus at aluminum smelters. Because its is a exothermic style weld it could be done with live bus bars. Plant shut downs are too costly when expanding capacity.
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