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Jerry Grulkey

USA
521 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2011 :  23:54:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey guys and gals how about writing a few paragraphs on how you started collecting...how about the one that got away...or the one that the old guy promised he'd call you if he ever wanted to part with it...and then gave it to the scrap pedaler 'cuz he thought you didn't want it anymore, or he was going to give it to his grand kid...and when he croaked the kid sold it to buy a shiny new "Crack" pipe.

Come on Girls and Boys we need a laugh these daze!

Jerry Grulkey

USA
521 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2011 :  23:57:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Title should be How I became addicted to Collecting. The site won't let me edit! See I am not always right...Merry Christmas to all and to all a good night!!! For the guys who want to bring up you post numbers here's you chance.

Edited by - Jerry Grulkey on 12/18/2011 14:42:21
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Jerry Grulkey

USA
521 Posts

Posted - 12/18/2011 :  14:39:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great keep it up folks! In reading the last post and having had some similar experiences I think being a collector requires skill from many different fields...one is psycho-analysis. I still don't know what lesson to learn from that.

Edited by - Jerry Grulkey on 12/18/2011 14:43:01
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bjd.

USA
1497 Posts

Posted - 12/18/2011 :  19:40:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I went to my first meet by accident-I had flown my plane to my parents home for a high school reunion, and being a few days early, went with them to the Niagra Falls meet in 1990. I did the ohwt there and had a lot of fun so I joined in time for the White River Junction, Vt meet. My dad found us a Warwick cushion tire bike and gave me a 1913 Utica built bike and we have been collecting from there! We now have over 30 bikes in the collection! Five high wheels, the high wheel trike, an adult tiller trike, five hard or cushion tires, and a bunch of pneumatics! Plus lamps, cyclometers, bells, whistles, repair kits, tools etc!

Bill Dizer
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David Toppin

USA
3802 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2011 :  11:27:58  Show Profile  Send David Toppin a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I was born into it. My dad bought his first highwheel in 1967 from a friend of his at work who had it blow up on his lawn in the big Worcester Tornado of 1953. The bike was a 50" Rival - See Rouse and Hazard catalog - and was missing rear wheel and in rough shape in general. The $25 he paid was probably too much for it. He has ridden a highweel at a car collector / dealer friend's house and became interested. My mother was an antiques dealer and all her friends knew they like bikes. I began to read the Wheelmen magazines and newsletters and developed an interest, when I was 12 in 1977 and my father was away I took a 52" Expert Columbia from 1885 out of the garage attic and taped some compressor hose on for tire and put a threaded rod though with a couple of check nuts to hold it in for the missing handlebar, climbed up on a wall and hopped on the bike and rode. I have no idea how I got off but I must have, cause I'm still here. My parents joined the club around 1970. My first annual meet was Smithville, NJ 1978 where my dad's 1884 American Star won best unrestored Star. I have attended many annual meets since then, Newport RI, Buffalo, NY, White River Junction, VT, Mystic CT, New Haven CT at Yale, Salisbury MD, IVCA in Canada, Mackinac and dozens (maybe hundreds I guess) of smaller meets and parades like Owls Head ME and Martha's Vineyard and Greenfield Village and Copake NY, ridden through the streets of Manhattan in the pouring rain and downtown Chicago at Rush Hour and in the middle of the night (thanks Carey...), made lots of good friends all over the world... and and.... Been a fun hobby...

Edited by - David Toppin on 12/19/2011 11:33:28
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DeLombardR

USA
1760 Posts

Posted - 12/20/2011 :  00:42:54  Show Profile  Visit DeLombardR's Homepage  Reply with Quote
...My meager start at collecting and riding stretches over several decades. I first rode an ordinary on a Friday evening in early May 1971 (or so) when Rex Little was giving rides the night before a 210-mile weekend ride. The Tour Of Scioto River Valley (TOSRV) is still going strong after 50 years. I enjoyed the ride around the parking lot and jumped in line for a second try. Should have bought one then.
...In the late-1970's, I met Bob Balcomb when he brought some young bike riders to a 50 mile bike ride I sponsored.
...Fast forward to late-1980's when a friend took me to Historic Roscoe Village in Coshocton, Ohio where the Wheelmen had an exhibit set up. Rekindled my interest. Should have bought one then.
...I joined the Wheelmen (sans wheel) and attended Findlay 1991 with my 1969 Raleigh RSW-16. At the Findlay meet, the Spillane family let me ride an Eagle a little. Should have bought one then.
...I finally realized that if I was going to ride an ordinary, I better buy one, so in 2007 I bought a Zimovcak from Del Nichols. I have really enjoyed riding it and we've done four centuries since then. Parades, exhibits, and four Annual Meets later, an Annual Meet is my responsibility.
...Last winter I acquired enough bikes to keep me (and wife) satisfied for a long time. An 1884 Expert-Victor (hybrid), Crescent and Warwick HTS's, and a Fairy tricycle.
...My first century was at the Dover meet and was special with Joff Summerfield congratulating me at the end. This was my second "first century" with my first "first century" on my first TOSRV in 1970. To commemorate my 40th TOSRV this past spring, I rode the Zimovcak for half of Saturday and Sunday (avoiding the hilly segment by riding my modern bike).
...As you may be able to tell, I am more of a 'rider' than a 'collector'. I don't plan on collecting a suite of machines but rather enjoy riding parades, centuries, riding at meets, and casual riding at home.
...For folks who were there in the infamous HOT 1991 Findlay meet, the dormitories are now FULLY AIR CONDITIONED! So, be there in July 2012!

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Carey Williams

856 Posts

Posted - 12/23/2011 :  01:19:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How I started collecting : born in to a family of antique collectors causes a ripple event on one's interests so toy trains led to pinballs, juke boxes, motion picture equipment , the next step was high wheel bicycles . In 1986 I chased down a 57" Columbia light roadster and enjoyed riding about town till a close road inspect occurred . Life got busy and the high wheel sat idle till news of the Schwinn auction in 1997. Walking into the auction house sure I could pick up a bit smaller machine , only to find a who's, who's of the cycling world shoulder to shoulder all with the same idea, none of us spare the bidder in the front row was to walk out with a bike that day. But the bug had bitten again so joining the Wheelmen and attending the meets, parades and Copake I was adopted in the loving family. The real beauty in collecting antique bicycles is you get to ride them! Whislt other collectibles sit on the shelf till the stray visitor wanders in , riding a high wheel out in the world immediately puts the rider in a great mood as the rest of the world is waving and smiling at you, ( much better and cheaper than any form of therapy). So whether it be riding the monthly critical mass ride or solo on a trail it is a pleasure just to ride up high. I love all aspects of the hobby collecting, conservation ( restoration without new paint or plating for those of you in Reo Linda), research, and riding . I've been very fortunate to meet wonderful friends all over the globe with the same shared interests. Pauper or prince once talking bikes the tables are level. If you attended last years Copake ride you'll be able to understand the magic that was felt in the air as we all mounted up and rode off , if not 2012 is just around the corner. 2009 the Manhattan ride after the annual meet climbing the Manhattan bridge (Brooklyn side) spiraling entrance 23 high bikes in line , 2003 Milwaukee Circus parade 103 high bikes circling the length of the parade --- it was a rolling meet, a sight that will never be forgotten , come out and ride! Cheers Carey
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Greg Barron

USA
1429 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2011 :  14:09:27  Show Profile  Visit Greg Barron's Homepage  Reply with Quote
And lest we forget, those people with large lots and big buildings tend to fill them up with stuff. My father used to always say, "Nature abhores a vacuum." As a result my places tend to fill up with junk. Some junk is better junk than other but I got started with stamps and comic books. Then moved on to cars and furniture. With a few bikes here and there. And motorcycles. And junk. Lot's of junk. I'm trying to decollect.
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David Toppin

USA
3802 Posts

Posted - 01/02/2018 :  21:23:48  Show Profile  Send David Toppin a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
This is a good thread and should be revived!
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RandyF

USA
29 Posts

Posted - 01/03/2018 :  09:34:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is a car story, so move along if you were expecting a bicycle tale. I was at a local show with my '38 Tudor Ford and spied a beautiful '61 Impala bubbletop, 30k miles, an original survivor and I knew the guy setting in front of it. I greeted him and asked how long he had had the car. He replied, "A week, wanna buy it?" I was ready to street rod the Tudor and knew I wouldn't attend another cruise-in for maybe years. I stupidly turned down a great offer, but called him the next day to take that deal. Problem was, he had talked to someone in the meantime and realized his offer was way low. He backed out. I saw him about once a year for a decade and every time the price was higher than the last. Finally, one day he phoned me and asked if I still wanted to buy that black Impala. I hesitantly replied that I did, but that it was probably out of my price range. To my surprise he again offered the car at the original bargain price. I couldn't get to the bank and lay bills on the hood of that car fast enough! It's been my car for 22 years, now. By the way, my first son was conceived a month after I got the Impala. Try not to get any mental pictures.
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DeLombardR

USA
1760 Posts

Posted - 01/04/2018 :  15:48:57  Show Profile  Visit DeLombardR's Homepage  Reply with Quote
As an update to my 2011 ramblings, here is one that DIDN'T get away.

Back in 2013, by a strange set of circumstances, I found a year-old discussion thread on The CABE about an 1897 Crescent tandem. Sounded like the guy wanted to be rid of it. A LOT of discussion and opinions by many people (including Wheelmen), but no resolution. The thread just stopped.

An e-mail from me to the owner revealed he still had it and didn't want to keep it anymore. A drive from northern Ohio to west-central Illinois got me a very nice 1897 Crescent tandem.

A small bit of restoration resulted in a nice tandem.

Of course, a Wheelmen clued me in to the two happiest days of a tandem owner: the first when you buy it, the second when you sell it.
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John Skocdopole

USA
141 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2018 :  18:42:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When I bought my first house it came with a few miscellaneous things in the attic. One was a TOC bicycle frame. The handle bars had a adjustable pivot in the middle. At the time I was riding my beginners high wheeler and winding down from bicycle camping on a modern bicycle. Few years latter found myself out of work and money. The only place I knew at the time that may want the frame was Schneider's Bike Shop in Cleveland Ohio. It was a crammed old shop located in town, but hanging from the ceiling was a whole bicycle museum. He gave me a few bucks for it and I regret it at every annual meet when I see all the fine rebuilt TOC bikes.

On a very sad note, Ken Schneider was robed in 2006. He was bludgeoned with a ball-peen hammer by a crack-addicted robber. Schneider, 60, who began working in his father's shop when he was 12, suffered a fractured skull and broken jaw. He survided but has some difficulty with his speech. The shop closed.
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